NetSquared Calgary Virtual Check-In: What are your tech needs through COVID / WFH?

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Recorded by NetSquared Calgary of May 13, 2020.

#Tech4Good minds work better together! How can we all help?

Following on from our virtual meet up in April, we thought we’d continue the conversation and gather the many sharp minds of Calgary and beyond.

Where are you at? Are there any new pain points you’d like to discuss? New seeds of hope to show us?

So many changes. Our new reality has been a challenge no matter which way you look at it. With staff working from home and now coming back, there are not many supports or rules to follow during this unprecedented time.

The nonprofit organizations that we work for and with are still walking a tightrope. They offer hope when there is none for so many.

Let’s connect! Let’s ask the questions! Together we will see it through.

—  Kelly & Mel - Your Co-organizers

 

Transcript


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Kelly Morris: I was just gonna ask out way to introduce himself.

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Kelly Morris: And I am Sheena to I think we can all we can all introduce ourselves. Really, and I can start for you if you like, Wade. And so my name is Kelly. I'm one of the co organizers for this event.

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Kelly Morris: We've been running now for a couple months. I guess this is our. This is our fifth one already. My gosh, or is it our third, fourth, I think it's our fourth

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Kelly Morris: We didn't really have one in February we kind of cut it short and we do

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Kelly Morris: Anyway, it's fun being at home just got the

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Kelly Morris: You know, the back to work kind of ideas from that update this afternoon. Wait, I assume you're in Alberta and

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Kelly Morris: Yeah, so there's some interesting information coming out of that.

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Kelly Morris: Announcement this afternoon.

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Kelly Morris: But yeah. Welcome, everybody. Thanks for coming. So

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Kelly Morris: Yeah, we do want to go next.

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Wade: Sure. Hey, Wade. I am a consultant

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Wade: Social Enterprise called converted knowledge and kind of building slowly. It's to engage patients as a piece in support specialists or individuals with challenges. There's a piece in support specialist to some system optimization in the healthcare system which is more kind of

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Wade: That may be more for profit, but

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Wade: Virgin knowledge is more like kind of a mixed profit. But I find the court thing is for the patients and and I'll always take somebody regardless of

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Wade: Whether they can turn on, just because of understand that that whole whole world. So I come from a technology background and then a consultant on called willingness technologies for profit and

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Wade: At a few other ideas, you know, the ideas always keep on going on to the key.

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Excellent.

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Wade: Yeah, and I mean it's very interesting time obviously throws us all out into a different context. And some of it may be just doing the same thing going digital but

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Wade: Yeah, just thinking of others and you know i'm i'm also elite have a app not lead up an app but lead of a neighborhood in a community platform called next door.

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Wade: So,

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Wade: I'm kind of compete in my neighborhood.

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Wade: Excellent sharing

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Wade: Sharing some stuff, but mostly in this group called the covert why why is he grew up, but now there's a lot of stuff you know like well together or mental health service that just came out or seen that one state to together. Well, there's been a few different resources like that.

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Wade: That have come out.

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Kelly Morris: So it's great to meet a lot of stuff I got onto that neighbor app. It's pretty cool, it's working well i think

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Wade: Yeah, you're on next door to you.

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Kelly Morris: Yeah, how can you not be everybody around talking about, though, there's a million bikes being stolen. That's probably the biggest thing.

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Kelly Morris: Anyway,

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Kelly Morris: Hopefully, you want to go next.

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Sure.

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Scott Payne: Sure. My name is Scott pain.

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Scott Payne: The director of business development for communicative which is a local digital marketing agency president of the company.

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Scott Payne: The comb should be joining us shortly. I just got a note from him on Slack that he's just having to rebuild his computer and we are excited to start working with mill and coming in to help organize more of these really great meetups and chat with folks and talk about some cool topics.

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Kelly Morris: Excellent, thanks God

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Kelly Morris: We have a couple more joiners welcome, Doug. Hi, Carrie. Hi, Chris. Thanks for coming back.

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Kelly Morris: And she is still there, too. Um, who would like to Austin. Do you want to go next.

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Kelly Morris: Just doing quick intros here guys.

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Okay.

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Dustin Poole: Yeah, my name is Dustin pool. I'm the president and CEO of the data space which is a collaborative sort of CO working space in downtown Calgary.

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Dustin Poole: I also run a sustainability and solar company and also the vice vice chair of the go technology Foundation, which is a nonprofit.

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Dustin Poole: That focuses on disruptive technology and innovation and my main role is running an energy company that we set up, which we use to fund our organization. So kind of like an X or direct energy. Same kind of thing. We also offer internet. So yeah, that's

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Right.

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Dustin Poole: Yeah, my name is Pat and I'm basically a storyteller.

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Dustin Poole: I would say

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Dustin Poole: I mean, I really understand communities and people, and I have my background is in graphic design.

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Dustin Poole: And creative direction.

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Dustin Poole: So I really understand how to sort of implement and execute campaigns and really connect dots, when you have something that you want.

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Dustin Poole: To achieve a goal or whatever. And then people out there that want that thing and then connecting those two dots. So that's, that's pretty much where my skill set is

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Kelly Morris: Awesome. Welcome. Thanks for joining us, and normally everybody we're usually at the meta space when we're physical

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Kelly Morris: will hopefully get back there. I do have a small goal of getting back to physical meetups probably by September at this point. So,

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Kelly Morris: And now you're Forest Park, tell me.

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Kelly Morris: Man.

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Forest Park: I think, yeah, I was just iPhone in my gender.

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Forest Park: Oh yeah. My name is Forest Park. I'm a software developer

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Forest Park: I build apps.

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Forest Park: And I mostly worked with Dustin and another partner named Jarvis.

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Forest Park: You also do a little VR AR stuff but Jarvis more the VR on more of the app development site so

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Forest Park: I'm just the tech guy.

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Kelly Morris: Not just for us. Thanks.

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Mel Sutjiadi: Is it under it and I asked specifically

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Forest Park: Do web. Web and also cross platform development. So I use a framework called flutter that just compiles to both iOS and Android. So

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Forest Park: Nothing specific

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Dustin Poole: Didn't you in a hackathon recently.

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Forest Park: Oh yeah, for me, TV. Yes, that was also thing.

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Forest Park: As

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Well,

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Forest Park: Oh,

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Forest Park: It was a. Oh, the theme was about open banking and using open baking data to make basically banking better. We made a app that can automatically go it to help

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Forest Park: Entrepreneurs basically basically sole proprietors with less than I think was 30,000 income because they have like a weird situation where they're just a side gig, but

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Forest Park: They don't know how to do their taxes. Very well. So it was an automatics tax no expense sorter that used like AI and machine learning machine learning to automatically sort your expenses when you spend it on your credit card or whatnot. So

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Forest Park: Unfortunately, we couldn't get hold of actual credit card transaction. So if anyone knows a finance people

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Kelly Morris: And interesting

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Kelly Morris: Mel, do you want to introduce yourself.

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Mel Sutjiadi: Sure. Um, well, I will call organizer helping Kelly get this going.

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Mel Sutjiadi: I by trade, I'm a designer web developer, I

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Mel Sutjiadi: Yeah, I also teach sometimes too.

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Mel Sutjiadi: But yeah, otherwise it's all about like copying design branding.

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Mel Sutjiadi: print and digital design illustration as well. So that's basically what I do and I love working with nonprofits. So that's why I'm here.

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Kelly Morris: Awesome. Thanks Mel.

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Kelly Morris: Sheena.

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Kelly Morris: Happy to come on and introduce

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Sheena’s iPhone: Everyone is she not, I am anything but tech anything. I work at a nonprofit. It's called wellspring Calgary, we support people living with cancer and the people that love them.

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Sheena’s iPhone: And do to coven 19 we have everything that we do online and it's been quite the adventure and continues to be, and I'm looking for any type of

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Sheena’s iPhone: Resources or things kind of it would have been great to learn things before coven hit us, but it is what it is. So I'm just looking for any kinds of opportunities that may support us and doing what we're doing online. Awesome.

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Kelly Morris: Welcome Sheena. You are my favorite.

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Kelly Morris: Charity in this town.

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Kelly Morris: For one, I love Patty and

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Kelly Morris: How he's been a mentor and a friend of mine for a very long time.

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Sheena’s iPhone: So. Wow, that's amazing. She you're absolutely right.

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Sheena’s iPhone: And today's incredible

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Kelly Morris: Welcome and everybody if we can all gather and help Sheena and wellspring I think that it would go a long way. So thanks. Carrie, welcome.

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Kelly Morris: If you want to come on and just introduce yourself quickly and we can

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Carrie Nermo: Oh, there we go. So I'm Carrie.

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Carrie Nermo: still fairly new in tech, but I've taken this opportunity to learn cloud. So I did a little bit with AWS. I'm now working on Azure and just, you know,

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Carrie Nermo: Creating my skills so I can actually get a job.

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Kelly Morris: Excellent. Well, welcome. Thank you for joining us today and Doug

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Doug Lacombe: Hi.

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Doug Lacombe: I'm good, I'm good. Just got back from walking the dog and it's warm out there so

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Doug Lacombe: Feel a little summer glow happening but yeah so douglas-home I own digital marketing agency communicator. Oh, my colleague Scott pain is on the call here as well. And we do digital marketing.

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Doug Lacombe: And we're just looking to help nonprofits.

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Doug Lacombe: Adapt just like Gina was talking about and try and use some of our skills and services to make life a little bit better from them when they're all stuck working from home without the tools they need. So that's our objective.

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Kelly Morris: Awesome. And David, I see you there. And Chris

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Kelly Morris: Thanks for joining us again, appreciate it.

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DDeere: Happy to be back.

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Awesome.

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Mel Sutjiadi: Good. Introduce yourself.

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DDeere: Here with a bit twiddling tweak technology solutions is basically it consulting we specialize in digital transformations of any scale and information security as well as training and education in terms of it empowerment

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Kelly Morris: Excellent.

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Kelly Morris: Cool. Chris, did you want to introduce yourself.

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ChrisVenne: Sure. Hi, I'm Chris. I'm a technology consultant. I specialize in helping nonprofit organizations get

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ChrisVenne: Into this nice environment that we're in right now when we have to do these

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ChrisVenne: fun conversation around using computers so

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Yeah.

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ChrisVenne: Great.

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Kelly Morris: Well, thanks for coming along again.

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ChrisVenne: For sure.

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Kelly Morris: Excellent.

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DDeere: Was getting outside of heavy come in.

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Kelly Morris: Awesome.

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Mel Sutjiadi: I think there's someone else just joined nothing

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Doug Lacombe: Oh, yeah.

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Mel Sutjiadi: Oh just left.

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Kelly Morris: Still there.

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Mel Sutjiadi: I can't

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Doug Lacombe: I don't see but

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Mel Sutjiadi: It.

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DDeere: does appear to mine as well.

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Yeah.

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Doug Lacombe: Everyone

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Doug Lacombe: I want better zoom bombs and that if we're going to get up, geez.

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Kelly Morris: It locked down we've lost a lot of our things anyway thanks everybody for introducing yourself and

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Kelly Morris: I suppose, like I said, one of the things we wanted to do is, you know, just talk about some of the pressures and some of the challenges we've had, I got, I got a hold of. Actually one of

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Kelly Morris: This great article that talks about the challenges that you know nonprofits are having. I'm not sure if anybody had a chance to read it. It's

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Kelly Morris: The highlights basically showcase the five current impacts, as I'm sure some of you are hearing about and I can kind of rattle them off, but the number one was, you know, disruption of service to clients and communities adjusting in person events to a virtual platform and then

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Kelly Morris: The biggest one, though at 90% was challenges of staff and volunteers needing to work remotely.

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Kelly Morris: And so I just thought I'd throw up the discussion and just

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Kelly Morris: Talk about some of maybe your wins and

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Kelly Morris: Maybe some of the challenges that you might have Shana specifically if you're having those carry if you're working with people who are having those and maybe we have some pros here that might be able to support and help us understand how to do that a little bit better.

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Kelly Morris: Anybody wants to put their hand up, take it away.

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Doug Lacombe: Well, I'll throw in an aside here, which is really just a follow on question, I think, to yours, which is

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Doug Lacombe: You know the ratio of people that are sort of tech comfortable to nonprofit in this particular meeting is pretty high tech pretty low users. And so one of the goals. I think that that

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Doug Lacombe: Mel and Kelly and Scott and I've been talking about is how do we take the skills that you know folks like us, have and attract in that audience of Nonprofit Users. The sheena's of the world, etc. And and and you know what do we want out of this group so

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Doug Lacombe: Yeah.

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Doug Lacombe: Maybe it's oversimplification. But maybe there's sort of a, you know, givers and receivers in this group. And so it'd be interesting to know what

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Doug Lacombe: Any of you would like to extract from the group or or what experiences, you're looking to have from the group.

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Doug Lacombe: You know what would

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Doug Lacombe: Are you hoping to you know get in on the ground and work with some nonprofits to get them.

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Doug Lacombe: Transformed to digital or or what. So it's, there's a little bit of what Kelly said, which is what are you experiencing.

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Doug Lacombe: And I go, that was a great little list there of things that we're hearing, too. And then the other part is

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Doug Lacombe: How do you, how do you think this group should go forward and we're going to do some survey work after this, too, and and and try and dig into that a little bit more. But I think the two go together.

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Doug Lacombe: So does anybody have either

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Doug Lacombe: Experiences with nonprofits that they want to share or

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Doug Lacombe: Want to share why you're in this meeting and

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Mel Sutjiadi: I'll be really great to. Can I hear from

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Mel Sutjiadi: Tina or carry about. I mean, that's our topic for the day is like, so what are you facing right now. What are your techniques.

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Yeah.

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Mel Sutjiadi: I'm curious to hear more from you to

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Kelly Morris: Her. She is

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Sheena’s iPhone: Yeah, well, even

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Sheena’s iPhone: Having the time space or language to even define what our

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Sheena’s iPhone: Tech needs are is a current challenge.

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Sheena’s iPhone: You know, you can imagine, as you just shared

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Sheena’s iPhone: People went into this all over the place in terms of their ability to do anything online.

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Sheena’s iPhone: We didn't receive any training.

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Sheena’s iPhone: I don't even know I we talked about training before this, because we're actually expanding to southern Alberta. So outside of the city of Calgary and we felt like technology was going to play a part, but we haven't even picked the platform yet.

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Sheena’s iPhone: And we went with zoom for a number of reasons. And we've been quite happy with with that.

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Sheena’s iPhone: But again, like we didn't plan that

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Sheena’s iPhone: One of the challenges we're having is that we weren't trained and we had to learn self study and do it.

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Sheena’s iPhone: We've been building the plane, while we've been flying it is what we're saying a lot a wellspring and

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Sheena’s iPhone: One of the and then we're we're having to learn ourselves and then train others. So that's tricky so trained volunteers to support programs and get re engaged.

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Sheena’s iPhone: With supporting what we deliver and our mission.

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Sheena’s iPhone: And training program leaders to deliver the program's themselves online and, you know, again, we didn't do we didn't know what we didn't know going into this. So,

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Sheena’s iPhone: We're doing some of the things after the fact. Now that

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Sheena’s iPhone: The initial crisis is over.

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Sheena’s iPhone: And we are delivering programs online.

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Sheena’s iPhone: Where one of the conversations were having a lot right now is we do have

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Sheena’s iPhone: A group of

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Sheena’s iPhone: People that we're serving that are having what we think are not zoom challenges that we're able to be helpful with but computers challenges and then we're like, how can we help them because we don't

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Sheena’s iPhone: We don't know what to recommend we can't

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Sheena’s iPhone: You know, we can't get into their computer and play around. Nor do we want to recommend like turning off their whatever that protects their computer and there's like Mac users and non Mac users and phones and no phones and iPads and no iPad so

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Sheena’s iPhone: Again, we are not, that's not our expertise humans our expertise so

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Sheena’s iPhone: We're having that conversation now about

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Sheena’s iPhone: How do we, where's the line. Where's the boundary about what we can help them with. And is there something that we can recommend for them to troubleshoot those other nine zoom program problems.

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Forest Park: So,

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My question is,

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Forest Park: No.

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Mel Sutjiadi: Sorry, sorry. My question is, so you are a

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Forest Park: Essentially a free service provider company that has a lot of different trainers and contracted a lot of different trainers.

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Sheena’s iPhone: Well, we have program leaders and before coded that we come to a wellspring center and then deliver a program in person.

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Forest Park: So I used before I was a software developer, I was a corporate trainer for 10 plus years, and as a manager. What I would set up is a standard for the

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Forest Park: Instructors I would be contracting, they would have to follow a certain guideline of how to conduct classes offline and online. I would

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Forest Park: Give them like a guideline, maybe, almost like a manual really of what kind of programs to use, how to use it if something happens there's there's a troubleshooting mounted on the side.

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Forest Park: Only and it was only because I didn't want the instructors to just go use anything like for example right now zoom. I guess it's pretty popular back, back in the day or Skype.

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Forest Park: But like if everyone every instructor is using a different program, for example, zoom, what is it, Skype, what are the other ones that Google meets or something then everyone's going to have 10 different problems and that's only three programs. That's 30 different problems.

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Forest Park: Right up but so I think it's very important to set up a standard of if you want to work with us. You have to work like this and

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Forest Park: It's not because we hate life. It's the

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Forest Park: Way.

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Forest Park: We can actually like

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Forest Park: Take care of whatever problems you might have

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Forest Park: Total it's eliminating more problems.

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Forest Park: And in that sense.

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Sheena’s iPhone: Well that's super reassuring for you to say that I don't know why, but we did make that decision early on.

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Sheena’s iPhone: And so it's our organization zoom account. And so, and we have control over it. And so, like, with all of this when we first started in the zoom bombing thing and security like zoom had such a bad name in the

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Sheena’s iPhone: Media and people all over our community. We're just like

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Sheena’s iPhone: Are you sure about this like

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Sheena’s iPhone: You know what I mean, like, are you putting X y&z at risk. So that's one thing we have stuck to you from the beginning. And that's been quite successful because we can control is

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Great.

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Wade: This is great.

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Wade: I'm just going to respond to

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Wade: To wellness fair. It reminds me

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Wade: Area.

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Wade: Plus

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Wade: Management Policy so

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Wade: Policy.

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Wade: And so tech plus policy but also you'd mentioned

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Wade: Mentioned

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Wade: Other issues around the settings of devices which becomes really difficult. Oh no. Phones just settings of the

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Wade: Video conferencing apps only or

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Wade: Or other other things about remote devices.

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Wade: But it also something also occurred to me was

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Wade: Sending out

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Wade: Like a while. It'd be kind of like an image, I guess in the in the computer world, but not sure necessarily an image would

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Wade: Would work in in this kind of wild west, but something where the settings are all packaged together, but that would only work with desktops, or laptops. I mean when I say work with iPads. I just wondered what

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Wade: It says name.

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Wade: Chris

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ChrisVenne: Well, that's exactly what I do is set up these kinds of environments.

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Wade: Or the other guys you

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ChrisVenne: Got to get the other guy the other guy is Dave, we can we can

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DDeere: Work together quite a bit, so we

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ChrisVenne: Were going to do this together a little bit. Okay. She not to answer your questions. I mean, it's sort of very, very long answer. We have models and we have templates on how to actually build and support organizations like yours.

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ChrisVenne: And

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ChrisVenne: What a young fellow forest was saying it was it he actually brought in a very important point which is standardized nation.

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ChrisVenne: In what you're looking at. As you're looking at

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ChrisVenne: Minimal costs, looking at having the costs are important, looking at hardware costs software cross training costs. So if you have a standard you're reducing your costs quite a bit.

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ChrisVenne: Because you only have to train on one platform one software one model.

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ChrisVenne: One of the things that is important above this this meeting right now is is supported by tech soup and through texts.

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ChrisVenne: Or you can if you know how. And again, this is where I come in a lot of the time if you know how to leverage tech soup. You can get

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ChrisVenne: A huge amount of the tools that you need to one where you're trying to do for free and. And when I say for freeze it costs us for a software company goals. Pretty much nothing

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ChrisVenne: When I'm running an organization in the coolness passive meaning for them here in Calgary, I have organizations in Edmonton and Winnipeg.

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ChrisVenne: And they're all managed from the comfort of manual chair here and they are running online classes where you're struggling right now to get yourself going

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ChrisVenne: We had them set up way before the situation occurred. And when it happened all the teachers, the instructors, the staff picked up the laptops and went home and they haven't lost a beat. So we're set up to help you.

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ChrisVenne: Get online if you want. Zoom is just a platform that

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ChrisVenne: We use to this communication. But there's other things that you may want to be looking at is, where do you store your data. How do you manage your data, how you protect your data new users and so forth like this.

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ChrisVenne: And you're the thing that you mentioned was interesting about people are having issues with their computer is. We also have a very, very economical platform, through which I can connect to.

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ChrisVenne: All the computer that I manage again from the comfort of my home and all that. So yeah, commercial for Chris. That was pretty good opt if you have these questions really are. I have the answers I may not have all the answers but I have the answers for you. And so does Dave and

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ChrisVenne: The thing is, is they're not really generic answers for us give the best answer that you need a standard

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ChrisVenne: And the standard is establishing, you and I, or wherever you pick really because there's all kinds of professionals in life but

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ChrisVenne: Is establishing the standard of communication, the standard of data you want to maintain and you go with that. And again, I just to summarize on this with the tools that are available to you.

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ChrisVenne: From Texas. This can be done at a really, really, really reasonable cost because a lot of it is going to be free, or a really, really reduced rate. So anyway, that was me.

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Doug Lacombe: I have some questions, Sheena, because I think you know

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Doug Lacombe: Like all meetings we dive right into problem solving, without asking enough questions.

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Mel Sutjiadi: Exactly. That's exactly what

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ChrisVenne: That's why you have to have these communications, like, not everybody has the same

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ChrisVenne: Perspective perspective of requirements. So yeah, we're having issues. So find a problem pursued an issue. She now you're having an issue.

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ChrisVenne: Find a person that may have a solution. I may have a solution or Dave may have a solution and then we can go on ultimate meetings and actually hammer out those. Okay, what is your problem, where are you now where do you want it. Where do you want to be in. How do we get you that

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Doug Lacombe: Yeah, exactly.

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ChrisVenne: Know, like you mentioned, was a dog. It was exactly that is finding the issues and the solution providers and let's get people together and solve these problems.

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Yeah.

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DDeere: If I, if I'm a Christian. And I

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DDeere: Wanted to

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DDeere: Pursue maybe Gina was

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DDeere: What's your budget for it because in all my dealings. It doesn't matter whether it's a nonprofit or not, but it does come up a lot more, and it's a lot more relevant with the nonprofit sector.

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DDeere: Is how much of your actual annual budget. Have you decided before you even decide to look at problems.

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DDeere: How much can I spend on on fixing all the problems that I have, because that's going to help inform and guide the, the actual solutions as well.

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Mel Sutjiadi: Okay, I feel like maybe we might be overcomplicating it because we don't actually know what the issues are these issues like how do I start my computer. Hi. Do I

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Mel Sutjiadi: Turn on my video, like it could be something really simple, which then I would suggest maybe having one zoom meeting with all your program leaders and just

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Mel Sutjiadi: Go through like some of these basic things right like that you're hearing people are saying, because I think we're talking about like security in it. And also, but I feel like it could just be a user like someone is not comfortable using a computer.

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Mel Sutjiadi: Well, even the chat.

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Mel Sutjiadi: Like, you know, right in the chat.

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Doug Lacombe: Yeah, like from a biz from an organizational from a business organization standpoint. What I'd be really interested in knowing. So you say, you know, you're from wellspring and you support people that have cancer or their, their families.

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Doug Lacombe: And so I presume that that probably means like counseling and, you know, kind of

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Doug Lacombe: Grief coping concepts and so on. But, but, and I also presume and so presumption is dangerous, but I presume that you

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Doug Lacombe: Deliver a lot of that through volunteers and so then I presume that you don't have tech control over the kit that they have

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Doug Lacombe: And maybe you're not prepared to buy it. So it'd be interesting to know what the actual use case is

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Doug Lacombe: That, you know, do you have staff, where you can say, hey, everybody's taken a Chromebook do this or do you have volunteers, where it's whatever they bring to the party and you have to cope with it.

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Doug Lacombe: Or how does this play out in the real world, because without that kind of background, it's pretty hard to start prescribing stuff. I would think, but

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Doug Lacombe: But you have the right answers around here. So, so maybe just fill us in a bit on who's doing this. And do you actually have budgetary control and tech control over them.

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Sheena’s iPhone: I'm

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Sheena’s iPhone: So,

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DDeere: Big on the spot, you know,

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Sheena’s iPhone: We have it support.

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Sheena’s iPhone: Who helped us

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Sheena’s iPhone: Move everybody from our centers to home.

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Doug Lacombe: Yeah.

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Sheena’s iPhone: So we've made that successful transition and we needed to move our programs on

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Sheena’s iPhone: Online and we happened to choose zoom because our partners in the East were using zoom and had good things to say about it, and then

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Sheena’s iPhone: Alberta health services. Our partner chose zoom as well. So that was reassuring for us. And it's been really awesome like in terms of being user friendly.

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Sheena’s iPhone: We are we are in the zoom pro weird like book zoom. We are in zoom one program at a time. Yeah, we have staff right now in every single program we're offering 25 programs, a week before coven we would be offering 75 a week.

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Sheena’s iPhone: Just on a scale.

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Doug Lacombe: And these are paid staffers that are giving these programs.

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Sheena’s iPhone: Well, they're not know. So they're supporting and zoom. So they are administrative Lee supporting it. So they're ensuring that people are getting in from the

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Sheena’s iPhone: From the waiting room that the people that are registered for the program are the people that were like moving into the room that we're doing a wellspring standard intro

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Sheena’s iPhone: You know, and then the program leader takes it away and does their thing for like an hour to

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Sheena’s iPhone: And then we kind of close the program answer any questions manage the chats managed new people coming into the waiting room, etc. And at this point, going into like week eight we're starting to

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Sheena’s iPhone: Train and support our volunteers to help us not be because this has been very administratively heavy

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Sheena’s iPhone: For us. And so, wanting to engage our volunteers and doing that. And again, we are using our own paid for zoom wellspring account.

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Sheena’s iPhone: Yeah, and we are the only ones scheduling it and we're opening the rooms and closing the rooms.

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Doug Lacombe: So the people that run these sessions. They're, they're paid employees.

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Sheena’s iPhone: That the people that deliver the program are paid contractors

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Doug Lacombe: Okay, so you can compel contractors to have

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Doug Lacombe: I mean over time. It takes transition, but you can compel contractors that you're paying to say to be a contractor. You know, like I think Chris mentioned,

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Doug Lacombe: If you want to be a contractor, then you have to adapt to our kit and here's the pathway to that kit so that, but are the majority of your tech problems.

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Doug Lacombe: People with cancer and their families, the recipients of the sessions.

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Sheena’s iPhone: Yes, that's who. That's who it is.

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Doug Lacombe: OK, so now we're talking patients, as it were. Yeah. And so you have no control over what computer. They have or their level of anything or it doesn't matter what tech soup offers probably you need the general populace to get the easiest path in to get their counseling session. Right, right.

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Doug Lacombe: Right. Okay, so that's that means maybe different training that has to accommodate all kinds of different equipment and skill levels. People that are digitally savvy or not. Right, so

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Doug Lacombe: That's what I was kind of driving at is that, you know, you can't just be like everybody with cancer. Get a Mac. It

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Doug Lacombe: Like that.

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Right.

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Doug Lacombe: Right, so

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Doug Lacombe: Yeah, so that's an interesting problem that is a much more public problem than than say a business problem that we almost steered into there for a second.

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Scott Payne: Well, the other thing that I that I picked up on. And maybe just to sort of refocus the conversation away from putting Sheena on the hotspot and and I opened it up to some other folks, is I feel like one of the things that I heard was

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Scott Payne: You know, people were sort of like nonprofits. We're chugging along and, you know, delivering

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Scott Payne: Variety of different programs and services and things like that.

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Scott Payne: And and then suddenly you know code 19 hits and everybody needs to figure out how to suddenly become a digital organization, but

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Scott Payne: Nobody very few you know very few nonprofits unless they happen to be relatively large organizations with large budgets and you have been around for, you know, multiple decades and have a big infrastructure.

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Scott Payne: Like have any sort of training on. Like what, like what the heck does that even mean to become a digital organization. So coming in from the perspective of like

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Scott Payne: What are your digital problems or what are your technical problems. It's like, I don't, we don't even know what our technical

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Scott Payne: Problems exactly like I mean like

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Scott Payne: Yeah, like there's a like step sort of removed or a step back, where

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Scott Payne: Where I wonder whether part of what this group could be doing. And so there's a checking here in terms of some of the other folks who are working with nonprofits.

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Scott Payne: Is that, like, has that been your experience in terms of interacting with some of the organizations that you've been interacting with. Is that like asking questions like,

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Scott Payne: What are your like, what are your technical issues. What are your, what are your digital challenges that you need to overcome is a step beyond like they don't even know what the, what the challenges are

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Scott Payne: But like part of what we can be looking to do is to have a conversation. And that starts to even flush out like what does it mean to become you know a digital organization. What does it mean to move

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Scott Payne: You know your your your operations on to digital platforms and and

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Scott Payne: And how do we even like before we get to asking questions. You know, set a set a common understanding of what the heck we're even talking about like we might be shooting past where a lot of the folks that ultimately we're looking to have a conversation with our app right now.

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Kelly Morris: Sorry, I was reading some of the chat. And I just want to remind everybody, there is a bit of a chat happening on the side here.

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Kelly Morris: And weights been offering some information.

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Kelly Morris: I would love to just present that the digital pieces, something that I think everybody is taking on board in different ways. One of the supports that I'm trying to offer is that, you know, we need to build it into the culture. Like, I think there's a lot of

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Kelly Morris: You know integration happening. Overall, and so we're trying to figure out how the old way worked with the new way. And some people work in the new way. And a lot of people still work in the old way.

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Kelly Morris: And I just wonder if there's, you know, more opportunities to know help people discover the reasons why the digital way works and how it can work to you know make a larger impact on their organizations.

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Kelly Morris: sheena's in a different you know specifically has some challenges around the, the second one that was 90% and that was disruption of service to clients and communities.

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Kelly Morris: And I think cancer patients, you know already have enough situation for sure. So they don't need to figure out how to get on the zoom, but they probably they do really need those resources that wellspring provides

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Kelly Morris: Sheena. Can I just ask you one question about, was there any opportunity to give training to the patients out of wellspring

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Kelly Morris: In terms of how to use zoom. Like, was there anything

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Kelly Morris: Yeah.

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Sheena’s iPhone: Well, um, we found some resources over the last eight weeks that we are sharing with our members and then

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Sheena’s iPhone: We're doing one on basically members are calling when they're struggling our members are people living with cancer and the people who care for them so

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Sheena’s iPhone: Basically they're calling us and we're staff whoever's picking up the phone is going through and troubleshooting.

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Sheena’s iPhone: But what as we've been doing that for almost eight weeks we're realizing there are some things that are like we literally can't help with. But honestly, Kelly, it's the, it's a tiny minority like

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Sheena’s iPhone: But now we're realizing we probably should be realizing for self where our limitations are

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Sheena’s iPhone: So we are, no matter who picks up the phone can

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Sheena’s iPhone: Know when enough is enough like know when we've done everything we can do because we're realizing it's really a lot of the problems are not zoom problems, their computer specific problem.

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Kelly Morris: User problems. Yeah, okay.

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Mel Sutjiadi: I think it'd be kind of cool, too, because since you've been experiencing this in eight weeks, different volunteers might have different knowledge to

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Mel Sutjiadi: And if you can gather up because you've probably seen patterns, right. Everyone has problem with this one issue. Let's put in a manual and keep adding to the ego.

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Mel Sutjiadi: Because you never know. Like one person's capacity could be like, oh, actually. So, so and so already answered that. On Tuesday, you know, like

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Sheena’s iPhone: Know for sure. So

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Mel Sutjiadi: Left rich what your internal knowledge, I guess, and put it into a manual

434
00:45:26.550 --> 00:45:28.860
Doug Lacombe: So Sheena. Do you

435
00:45:32.280 --> 00:45:40.710
Doug Lacombe: Have you had an opportunity. And of course it's been chaos for eight weeks. So there's no right answer or wrong answer here. But have you had an opportunity to maybe

436
00:45:42.150 --> 00:45:44.550
Doug Lacombe: Start an onboarding

437
00:45:45.060 --> 00:45:49.230
Doug Lacombe: Program that says, okay, you're going to get your counseling through zoom

438
00:45:50.250 --> 00:45:59.820
Doug Lacombe: You know, probably you're capable of watching a YouTube video and receiving email because 95% of people could at least cope with that.

439
00:46:00.750 --> 00:46:08.700
Doug Lacombe: Is there sort of a onboarding like watch these videos. This is how a zoom thing works. This is like is there that kind of like

440
00:46:09.240 --> 00:46:20.160
Doug Lacombe: Effectively, how do we get you out of being tech support and into getting them into their counseling session because it was no problem to drive to your building and show up because they know how to do that.

441
00:46:20.670 --> 00:46:32.670
Doug Lacombe: So the problem really is arrival right if they attendance is is kind of at least one problem you have identified. So what's onboarding like because you didn't have to do that before.

442
00:46:34.740 --> 00:46:35.670
Sheena’s iPhone: Yeah, so

443
00:46:37.260 --> 00:46:44.700
Sheena’s iPhone: We found this. I don't know somebody found it on our team, thank goodness. A couple weeks and and it's basically a document.

444
00:46:46.260 --> 00:46:49.650
Sheena’s iPhone: That describes how to join zoom

445
00:46:50.670 --> 00:46:58.650
Sheena’s iPhone: Which has been great. So that's a resource. So we refer to that and we have that on our website. For instance, and then we do

446
00:46:59.340 --> 00:47:08.760
Sheena’s iPhone: Troubleshooting on the spot. As I mentioned, over the phone, one on one. And then one of our volunteers who felt quite comfortable with zoom started offering one on one sessions.

447
00:47:09.000 --> 00:47:14.070
Sheena’s iPhone: And she's been offering those for us for weeks. I don't know where we would be without that

448
00:47:15.180 --> 00:47:16.080
Doug Lacombe: It's amazing the

449
00:47:16.110 --> 00:47:32.070
Sheena’s iPhone: Staff did not have capacity to do that and still don't. Um, so that's helped a lot. And now, as I mentioned, we're just realizing that there's this small group of people that we're not really sure what to do with. But we're not able to help them.

450
00:47:33.360 --> 00:47:43.740
Doug Lacombe: And is the, is there a commonality among those people that you can't help like is it there at five, and they simply cannot use technology and this just isn't going to happen or what

451
00:47:44.400 --> 00:47:45.780
Sheena’s iPhone: They're older, for sure.

452
00:47:46.050 --> 00:48:02.190
Sheena’s iPhone: Yeah, yeah, they're older. For sure. And they're following kind of the instructions that we're giving them both in writing and over the phone, and they're still problems like with their antivirus software won't let them go to the next step or

453
00:48:03.330 --> 00:48:04.200
Sheena’s iPhone: They can

454
00:48:06.510 --> 00:48:17.940
Sheena’s iPhone: They so we see people using two devices. Quite often, because like their computer, they can't hear or we can't hear them or they're like looking at us on their computer

455
00:48:18.090 --> 00:48:23.760
Sheena’s iPhone: Yeah, but they're like little the audio pieces on their cell phones. So then there's like this feedback thing.

456
00:48:23.970 --> 00:48:24.990
Doug Lacombe: Yeah yeah

457
00:48:25.080 --> 00:48:27.510
Sheena’s iPhone: Happening. And yeah, those kind of things.

458
00:48:28.830 --> 00:48:39.810
Doug Lacombe: Yeah, so I wonder, you know, if, if, like a stop gap is just dial into this actual telephone number because you know what a landline is and skip the

459
00:48:39.870 --> 00:48:45.420
Sheena’s iPhone: Yes. Yes, exactly. And we we do we give those options like joined by zoom via this link.

460
00:48:45.900 --> 00:48:51.900
Sheena’s iPhone: On the website like zoom dot whatever and put in the meeting ID or a third option just call in

461
00:48:52.890 --> 00:48:54.120
Sheena’s iPhone: Yeah yeah

462
00:48:54.300 --> 00:48:55.560
Sheena’s iPhone: Cuz that we provide that

463
00:48:55.560 --> 00:49:00.090
Doug Lacombe: Information that's at least a band aid for so people aren't left high and dry complete

464
00:49:00.090 --> 00:49:00.810
Exactly.

465
00:49:02.970 --> 00:49:10.800
Doug Lacombe: Yeah, and then trying to find the commonalities, so that maybe you could do like an FAQ tech support blog post or something that's like

466
00:49:11.340 --> 00:49:16.860
Doug Lacombe: If your antivirus says this, then do that or you know whatever right like chipping away at the biggest

467
00:49:16.860 --> 00:49:18.360
Sheena’s iPhone: Bomb. Yeah.

468
00:49:18.630 --> 00:49:29.670
Doug Lacombe: Until you get the majority of folks in. I mean, I've been helping a, a former boss of mine, get a blog going and he's

469
00:49:30.660 --> 00:49:40.890
Doug Lacombe: An ex newspaper guy. And so he's an awesome writer and everything, but he never was a tech guy. He's older than me and I'm old as dirt. So, and then also

470
00:49:41.760 --> 00:49:46.710
Doug Lacombe: He's got Parkinson's. And so he struggles to remember instructions from one thing to the next.

471
00:49:47.190 --> 00:49:56.340
Doug Lacombe: And so I've actually had quite a an onboarding experience in the last few weeks. Helping. Helping my, my friend. Get his thing. The end.

472
00:49:56.610 --> 00:50:07.410
Doug Lacombe: You know, I've learned the power of doing screenshots and little video tutorials and documenting and providing options and you know he's more comfortable on his

473
00:50:07.410 --> 00:50:10.230
Doug Lacombe: IPad that on his mac book. So he does his

474
00:50:10.350 --> 00:50:16.320
Doug Lacombe: His blog posts on his iPad. And so I just wonder if you know, collectively, if we could you know maybe

475
00:50:16.950 --> 00:50:22.800
Doug Lacombe: Like if the wider group might be able to chip in and say, Oh, I'll do a piece on how to

476
00:50:23.190 --> 00:50:34.830
Doug Lacombe: Defeat your virus software and, you know, or whatever. I'm not defeat. But, you know, Sidestep it in order to get this or, you know, maybe there's contributions that could be a bit of a barn raising and tech support.

477
00:50:35.640 --> 00:50:37.500
Sheena’s iPhone: I think that's been one of the

478
00:50:38.880 --> 00:50:41.160
Sheena’s iPhone: Surprises in this is that

479
00:50:42.660 --> 00:50:45.630
Sheena’s iPhone: Why don't these resources already exists.

480
00:50:45.690 --> 00:50:47.100
Sheena’s iPhone: And like, Why aren't they easy to

481
00:50:47.220 --> 00:50:53.460
Sheena’s iPhone: Find and just use versus like our organization having to do that to like because we're just not going to

482
00:50:53.460 --> 00:50:55.260
Sheena’s iPhone: Get to it. You know, like

483
00:50:55.680 --> 00:51:03.000
Forest Park: One of the biggest recommendations here is instead of thinking about individual problems like as they come up is

484
00:51:05.100 --> 00:51:10.200
Forest Park: So you said you mentioned that there was one volunteer those doing most of the tech support. I'm

485
00:51:13.230 --> 00:51:32.070
Forest Park: Going to put it. The most important thing is documentation basically documentation documenting basically what kind of problems have been occurring. The most most frequently. Most recently, and then reverse kind of tackling that by priority order and

486
00:51:33.840 --> 00:51:42.330
Forest Park: As he did mention there are going to be those outliers that will be impossible to help, it's always going to be those 3% of just

487
00:51:43.620 --> 00:51:55.110
Forest Park: Every business that are just impossible to do anything with unfortunately. But, um, and also even when you're trying to, I guess, source these kind of

488
00:51:56.400 --> 00:52:13.320
Forest Park: Solution methods. I think it's very important to put a standard to it on the format, how to write it what to write in and all that back in the day, what I used to do was document all the

489
00:52:13.890 --> 00:52:27.090
Forest Park: technical problems that might come in with these online classes and then it feels fixable fix it. But if not, what is it just creates kind of video tutorials around them.

490
00:52:29.250 --> 00:52:31.500
Forest Park: And just throw them like a YouTube link.

491
00:52:33.420 --> 00:52:35.970
Forest Park: And because there's only so many

492
00:52:37.020 --> 00:52:39.720
Forest Park: People who can actually talk to a person and

493
00:52:40.320 --> 00:52:44.670
Forest Park: Yeah, at the end of the day it's, that's all. All human resource cost.

494
00:52:45.030 --> 00:52:46.740
Forest Park: Exactly. Oh.

495
00:52:46.860 --> 00:52:47.700
Forest Park: No, I really like

496
00:52:48.300 --> 00:52:49.950
Sheena’s iPhone: What you're saying, I like that.

497
00:52:50.040 --> 00:52:53.250
Sheena’s iPhone: No, I like and that's one of our challenges is that

498
00:52:53.760 --> 00:53:09.810
Sheena’s iPhone: It's so sporadic like the phone rings somebody picks it up. Right. And if that's what you like. We're not feeding it. We're not documenting it but people are just referring to it as this happened. And this, but like, it's not all in one place. So that's helpful for sure.

499
00:53:10.500 --> 00:53:23.580
Forest Park: So I guess like you'd have to go like a level higher than that as a manager who is who is overseeing these I guess textbook. People have to give them a manual on. Okay, uh, who called

500
00:53:24.150 --> 00:53:31.830
Forest Park: age group right down the age document age group. What kind of problem is it does this problem already exist, go to page, whatever.

501
00:53:32.850 --> 00:53:38.730
Forest Park: To give assistance if not do this like a decision tree type of thing.

502
00:53:39.240 --> 00:53:40.860
Forest Park: And it takes

503
00:53:41.940 --> 00:53:53.160
Forest Park: a ridiculous amount of time to build that database, but once you do. Oh yes, like that's like the telemarketers are are so successful.

504
00:53:54.870 --> 00:53:56.700
Forest Park: You'll just say literally everything

505
00:53:57.600 --> 00:53:58.020
So,

506
00:53:59.100 --> 00:54:10.890
Forest Park: building it up is daunting, but if you approach it with the mindset of I have to build it. Then there's really no other way around. It just got to get on the grind. Yes.

507
00:54:10.950 --> 00:54:16.350
Doug Lacombe: Yep, yep. But I love what forest said there about prioritization because you know

508
00:54:16.380 --> 00:54:18.480
Doug Lacombe: The old 8020 rule right if you can get

509
00:54:18.480 --> 00:54:18.810
Sheena’s iPhone: Rid of

510
00:54:19.530 --> 00:54:27.840
Doug Lacombe: 80% of your tech support problems, then you can deploy those volunteers to more useful things and expand your programming and all that stuff. So

511
00:54:28.380 --> 00:54:34.710
Doug Lacombe: You know, potentially people from this group could help you build the cataloguing the database and the

512
00:54:35.160 --> 00:54:39.810
Doug Lacombe: I mean, you know, back in the old days, used to sell advertising and you tell advertisers.

513
00:54:40.170 --> 00:54:52.890
Doug Lacombe: Just, you know, where did you hear of US Yellow Pages. Okay, that's a stroke in the Yellow Pages call them. So what kind of problem do you have, okay what PC. Do I have a Mac. Okay, that's a Mac problem and you know if you started to

514
00:54:53.160 --> 00:55:00.360
Doug Lacombe: Kind of even this get that rudimentary stuff in whatever format you can date spreadsheet database, whatever.

515
00:55:00.630 --> 00:55:11.070
Doug Lacombe: Then, and you can ascertain what your ad 20 ratio actually starts to look like. And then, you know, maybe crowdsource people to help solve the hey you know

516
00:55:11.340 --> 00:55:25.740
Doug Lacombe: Doug or, you know, Kelly or whomever. Can you guys crowdsource a wiki on how to fix problem X and then there's a link, you can send to people from then on that appear to have problem X or

517
00:55:26.070 --> 00:55:40.830
Doug Lacombe: So, you know, there may be a way to kind of crowdsource it and take some of the pressure off you, but it requires identification of priorities from your end for sure, but even that, you know, helping to set up a system might not be that difficult.

518
00:55:41.790 --> 00:55:51.810
Kelly Morris: Totally. Thanks, Doug great ideas, everybody we're coming closer to I did give us an extra 15 minutes today. So I don't know if everybody saw that

519
00:55:53.700 --> 00:55:54.630
Kelly Morris: But I just thought I'd

520
00:55:56.310 --> 00:55:56.550
Doug Lacombe: Well,

521
00:55:57.030 --> 00:56:02.010
Kelly Morris: I want to thank everybody for helping Sheena. She and I hope we did not overwhelm you. I think there's been some great

522
00:56:02.160 --> 00:56:03.120
Sheena’s iPhone: Thanks you guys

523
00:56:03.300 --> 00:56:04.590
Kelly Morris: Great messages.

524
00:56:05.670 --> 00:56:08.610
Kelly Morris: Here I've learned to lock for sure, especially as we

525
00:56:08.640 --> 00:56:13.770
Kelly Morris: Roll into like I consult to nonprofits and forest is burning himself for something

526
00:56:19.560 --> 00:56:21.840
Doug Lacombe: That was a facial expression like

527
00:56:24.030 --> 00:56:25.410
Kelly Morris: Yeah, I'm

528
00:56:26.040 --> 00:56:27.330
Kelly Morris: Anyway, I just thought

529
00:56:28.320 --> 00:56:32.340
Kelly Morris: You know, we could go through a few of the items that maybe

530
00:56:33.840 --> 00:56:50.460
Kelly Morris: You know the rest of the group is kind of wanting to sift through things you'd like to discuss. There's a lot of, you know, there's lots of peers here in my opinion that, you know, you might want to discuss how you can help your clients or your

531
00:56:51.480 --> 00:56:55.950
Kelly Morris: Or your nonprofits. If you're working with them and anything

532
00:56:56.220 --> 00:56:58.440
DDeere: Kelly, can I just jump in real quick because I

533
00:56:58.440 --> 00:56:58.740
Kelly Morris: Haven't

534
00:56:58.860 --> 00:57:05.100
DDeere: Already started dancing around it and and you're hinting at it touching on and all that sort of thing.

535
00:57:06.660 --> 00:57:16.470
DDeere: As a nonprofit organization you're not there to do it support, you're not there to do tech support people like Chris and myself and I'm not sure even who else in this room.

536
00:57:16.830 --> 00:57:28.470
DDeere: Is is qualified or capable, but that's what we do. It's like me coming into your organization and saying, well, I really want to help people with cancer, you know, what can I do and jumping in and starting trying to cure cancer.

537
00:57:29.250 --> 00:57:33.930
DDeere: Lung cancer. I'm not qualified. I'm not trained in that i don't know what i wouldn't even know right

538
00:57:34.050 --> 00:57:40.770
DDeere: Right. It's a lot of it comes I think with with delegation and that was where I was initially trying to hint at with the

539
00:57:41.160 --> 00:57:46.830
DDeere: You know having a budget in mind if you know what your budget is then you know where your resources extend to and you know where the end

540
00:57:47.070 --> 00:57:56.550
DDeere: And that's where you need to bring someone in Who's Who does know what they're doing and can help people deal with these problems set up a process, set up a system, whatever it is, like Doug suggested some great ideas.

541
00:57:57.720 --> 00:58:07.200
DDeere: And let the people that know how to do that do that and you stick to what you do, which is helping people or or doing whatever it is that you do. So there's a real sort of a muddy.

542
00:58:07.740 --> 00:58:14.340
DDeere: Idea around that. And I think if we can crystallize that a little bit within our amongst ourselves. Even I think that's progress.

543
00:58:16.950 --> 00:58:23.010
Kelly Morris: I appreciate that. Thanks David. Anyone else have any comments to make or

544
00:58:25.050 --> 00:58:32.760
Mel Sutjiadi: I guess I saw Ellery and Carrie here and then just wondering if they are listening.

545
00:58:33.750 --> 00:58:34.770
Carrie Nermo: Yes, I am.

546
00:58:35.490 --> 00:58:36.960
Mel Sutjiadi: Okay, I say,

547
00:58:38.100 --> 00:58:41.190
Carrie Nermo: Actual, you know, I forgot to say hi to forest.

548
00:58:42.060 --> 00:58:45.270
Carrie Nermo: You know, I heard because we were in the same cohort so

549
00:58:46.530 --> 00:58:54.330
Carrie Nermo: I I have officially become a full stack developer. I'm not very good, but you know, I'm just

550
00:58:54.510 --> 00:59:06.510
Carrie Nermo: I'm continuing my tech and and I'm just a volunteer like I've I volunteer for dozens of charities and I know one of my, my best buddies, who's now moved to

551
00:59:06.840 --> 00:59:25.710
Carrie Nermo: Victoria. He used to work in a tech capacity at buds and blooms and I will say the one thing that's missing from my career is I, I don't have any real world experience with it. I mean, I'm, I'm doing my own thing and it's like, Okay, today I'm going to learn cloud.

552
00:59:26.730 --> 00:59:42.540
Carrie Nermo: But I don't have any opportunities to put that into practice. So as much as I would love to work for a volunteer organization because I know, dozens and I've offered my help to some, but it's like, yeah, I can't do that.

553
00:59:44.370 --> 00:59:45.540
Carrie Nermo: So I'm just

554
00:59:46.890 --> 00:59:50.550
Carrie Nermo: You know, hoping, hoping for an opportunity, a paid one would be great.

555
00:59:52.320 --> 00:59:52.590
So,

556
00:59:56.160 --> 00:59:59.010
Kelly Morris: Anyone else have any comments.

557
01:00:00.210 --> 01:00:01.530
Kelly Morris: Questions for each

558
01:00:01.530 --> 01:00:01.830
Kelly Morris: Other

559
01:00:02.310 --> 01:00:12.000
Mel Sutjiadi: I think certainly. I mean, smaller nonprofit might be a good opportunity to offer those services, maybe at a discount

560
01:00:12.630 --> 01:00:26.430
Mel Sutjiadi: Compared to like someone who's has a lot of life experience with it. So I would say, like, just keep the communication going in. You never know. Be specific. And what you are capable off and what you want to do.

561
01:00:27.510 --> 01:00:29.730
Carrie Nermo: Yeah, I think that's why I just be paid.

562
01:00:30.000 --> 01:00:31.080
Mel Sutjiadi: The same thing. Yeah.

563
01:00:32.700 --> 01:00:34.170
Forest Park: No, you got a GitHub.

564
01:00:35.130 --> 01:00:35.640
Carrie Nermo: I do

565
01:00:36.270 --> 01:00:39.270
Carrie Nermo: What's your GitHub cracking why why see

566
01:00:40.380 --> 01:00:40.920
Mel Sutjiadi: A nice

567
01:00:43.050 --> 01:00:44.250
Carrie Nermo: That's great. I have some

568
01:00:44.340 --> 01:01:00.420
Carrie Nermo: Some crap there, but I have I have projects started but I even even that is as a portfolio of my my conquests. I'm finding it very, very difficult to to keep that momentum going.

569
01:01:03.270 --> 01:01:04.110
Forest Park: Oh,

570
01:01:05.580 --> 01:01:19.170
Forest Park: Well, one of the approaches, I make when I want to just work on a personal project is um I don't try to validate my projects. A lot of people when they start personal projects is gonna go make the millions

571
01:01:19.500 --> 01:01:19.950
Forest Park: And try

572
01:01:20.550 --> 01:01:29.910
Forest Park: Try start to validate it first. But at the end of the day, if you're doing it for practice, you just build it and if it makes money. Good.

573
01:01:31.260 --> 01:01:31.950
Forest Park: If it doesn't

574
01:01:33.090 --> 01:01:46.080
Forest Park: You still made a project because a lot of people I see when they are trying to make these personal project they tried to validate it first, like, oh, it's like it's going to be a waste of time and they just don't end up building it so

575
01:01:46.260 --> 01:01:46.620
Carrie Nermo: Yeah.

576
01:01:46.920 --> 01:01:47.940
Forest Park: Just build it first.

577
01:01:49.980 --> 01:02:01.260
Carrie Nermo: Well, there aren't enough hours in the day because half the day I look for work and quarter of the day I code and the other the rest of time. I'm drinking and sleeping.

578
01:02:04.650 --> 01:02:06.570
DDeere: And cat videos don't forget cat videos.

579
01:02:08.790 --> 01:02:09.360
Forest Park: Videos.

580
01:02:11.490 --> 01:02:13.230
Forest Park: Block up two hours a day for that.

581
01:02:15.000 --> 01:02:30.480
Dustin Poole: I think it's important to like if you have this idea in your mind just always there. You could take 30 seconds or five minutes or whatever it is, at any point, when you think of it just just chip away at that thought and progress.

582
01:02:30.570 --> 01:02:40.680
Carrie Nermo: Whatever. No. Well, here's something odd that I think about constantly. So I've been looking just looking at a lot of websites and see

583
01:02:41.070 --> 01:02:47.880
Carrie Nermo: You know what they have and what you know how they've been designed in things like this and I

584
01:02:48.600 --> 01:02:57.930
Carrie Nermo: I think that doesn't seem overwhelming. Now I will tell you in the first in the first six months, the full six months of the cohort.

585
01:02:58.410 --> 01:03:21.210
Carrie Nermo: I had fear and and just everything seemed like magic. Like when I change the Google start page. It's like, oh my god. That's magic. And so what I've really really had to, to think, you know, anything that I create is actually going to have some value because you know for me.

586
01:03:24.060 --> 01:03:40.170
Dustin Poole: That's good, I think. I think any, any time you think about something, it's it's really you're putting your investing that energy your thought energy into building that thing. And it's important to just like look at it as like beneficial.

587
01:03:40.620 --> 01:03:50.580
Dustin Poole: To think about things, even if it's for three seconds or five minutes, just like it doesn't have to be like structured, I have to sit down and do this thing.

588
01:03:50.970 --> 01:03:59.070
Dustin Poole: For five minutes like whenever you have a thought just slowly build that thought whenever it pops in your head and eventually it will grow into something

589
01:04:06.810 --> 01:04:08.850
Dustin Poole: Just it just my two cents.

590
01:04:10.350 --> 01:04:14.010
Mel Sutjiadi: Thanks. Carrie. I love it. It's turning into inspirational talk now.

591
01:04:15.600 --> 01:04:17.190
Mel Sutjiadi: Thinking of what is my thing.

592
01:04:18.570 --> 01:04:20.250
Mel Sutjiadi: Well, you know, I will tell you.

593
01:04:20.310 --> 01:04:33.690
Carrie Nermo: In the beginning, I could not envision that the the loops and the maps and the fours and the this and that could actually amount to anything.

594
01:04:34.320 --> 01:04:50.430
Carrie Nermo: So now that I've really sort of, I wouldn't say analyzed different websites but I go on and just like, Okay. Now that's pretty damn close to static. Oh, this one has some more complicated features. Oh, I wonder how how that happens. So

595
01:04:50.850 --> 01:04:59.790
Carrie Nermo: The mysticism and the fear of creation has, like I said, it has really come down.

596
01:05:01.230 --> 01:05:09.660
Dustin Poole: I think that's the thing to like we in our minds we withhold ourselves and we think, Oh, I can't do this.

597
01:05:11.130 --> 01:05:13.950
Dustin Poole: Is whatever I can't think this thought because

598
01:05:15.180 --> 01:05:24.480
Dustin Poole: I haven't set aside time for whatever, whatever, but just if if you have a thought just categorize it and save it and just be like,

599
01:05:24.930 --> 01:05:41.640
Dustin Poole: Yes, this is, this is going to be a good thing for later. I'll use it later. And then, no that's 10 seconds. Move on to your next thing just just don't push it away because the mind has a tendency to like push away these sort of thoughts and and when we build a lot

600
01:05:41.880 --> 01:05:46.650
Dustin Poole: Over time, they did become a great thing. Mm hmm.

601
01:05:49.200 --> 01:05:51.270
Carrie Nermo: Well, definitely get better. It's only been a year.

602
01:05:52.320 --> 01:05:52.980
Year and a bit

603
01:05:55.350 --> 01:05:55.590
Dustin Poole: Well,

604
01:05:55.620 --> 01:05:56.850
Mel Sutjiadi: We have lots of timing the

605
01:05:56.850 --> 01:05:58.170
Dustin Poole: All the time the world so

606
01:06:02.640 --> 01:06:09.840
Carrie Nermo: So nobody fork anything off of my my GitHub, because it's not very good at this moment.

607
01:06:10.920 --> 01:06:12.120
Kelly Morris: Awesome, but

608
01:06:12.210 --> 01:06:13.590
Carrie Nermo: It will be someday.

609
01:06:17.130 --> 01:06:17.370
Kelly Morris: Yeah.

610
01:06:17.400 --> 01:06:18.210
Kelly Morris: Go ahead with

611
01:06:19.050 --> 01:06:25.320
Wade: Just for Doug or the communicator team. So we need to surveys and polls, there's obviously a very

612
01:06:26.430 --> 01:06:29.250
Wade: Specific way you pick your questions for the outcome.

613
01:06:30.690 --> 01:06:33.690
Wade: But with status calls, which you think are very simple.

614
01:06:34.800 --> 01:06:35.820
Wade: Sometimes you never get

615
01:06:35.970 --> 01:06:44.190
Wade: Any engagement, unless you have a huge cohort. Right, so I just wonder what do you thought about that and engaging more people and bolts.

616
01:06:50.610 --> 01:07:06.210
Scott Payne: Had to jump off the call here, so he's not around to answer that question. So it can you just can you read. I'm not sure exactly what you're what you're looking for feedback on I can do my best to try and answer it from our perspective.

617
01:07:06.960 --> 01:07:17.400
Wade: Well, you just think that the polls are very simple, but you never get any engagement with them. Sometimes, unless you have a large amount of people on your email list or in your group. But even then,

618
01:07:18.660 --> 01:07:21.120
Wade: You know, sometimes you don't get any engagement with polls.

619
01:07:22.920 --> 01:07:33.570
Scott Payne: Well, yeah. And I mean, like, making sure that, you know, I'll take a crack at answering your question me but like making sure you understand

620
01:07:34.110 --> 01:07:44.970
Scott Payne: Like who your audiences and and asking the right questions of that audience. I feel like like when people put pulls together and then they don't get any sort of engagement and

621
01:07:45.630 --> 01:08:00.390
Scott Payne: It's because the questions that they've asked her audience like isn't isn't relevant to that audience and be like the questions aren't germane to the relationship that you have with that particular audience, you know, if you if you're

622
01:08:01.440 --> 01:08:08.190
Scott Payne: You know, if, for example, if communicated a sentence a, you know, pull out there to folks that you know that we

623
01:08:08.400 --> 01:08:10.230
Scott Payne: Have on a distribution list.

624
01:08:11.190 --> 01:08:18.030
Scott Payne: And we're talking about and we're asking them questions about like food.

625
01:08:18.930 --> 01:08:25.860
Scott Payne: People are going to pay any attention to that whole because we're not like we're not in the business of providing people with food.

626
01:08:26.490 --> 01:08:38.610
Scott Payne: Or pulling them on food or getting their, their experience of going to restaurants or anything like that. Now we're in the business of marketing and digital digital marketing digital tools social media, you know, those sorts of things.

627
01:08:39.450 --> 01:08:51.630
Scott Payne: So, you know, like, and you can put it, you can put a pull together or a survey together on any, you know, number of different topics and fired up to, you know, a large group of small small group at a, you know,

628
01:08:53.130 --> 01:09:04.590
Scott Payne: Is that you know is that group of people going to be interested in answering questions and engaging on the topic that you're that you're looking to survey them on and be like, Have you developed some

629
01:09:05.520 --> 01:09:15.210
Scott Payne: Some degree of legitimacy, or like some some reputational sort of leverage in terms of having a conversation about whatever it is you're you're pulling you're pulling the ball.

630
01:09:17.040 --> 01:09:28.440
Scott Payne: So you know i mean i think paying paying attention. I would imagine that Pat has something to say about that as well as somebody who, you know, as it as it stands for storytelling and how to engage folks and and you know

631
01:09:31.110 --> 01:09:38.070
Scott Payne: Doing some evaluation in terms of who your audiences and what they're interested in how you go about engaging them on those things.

632
01:09:40.560 --> 01:09:40.830
Scott Payne: That make

633
01:09:40.890 --> 01:09:42.420
Scott Payne: Sense that answer your question.

634
01:09:42.900 --> 01:09:54.540
Wade: Today reputational leverage of it's it's very good. Do you think there's a difference between using like a stock old tool and a website versus survey monkey or service com or

635
01:09:55.620 --> 01:09:59.520
Wade: Any pulled maker. That's external to the website you're engaging on

636
01:10:00.630 --> 01:10:05.340
Scott Payne: Um, I mean, I think, ultimately, it depends on on

637
01:10:06.540 --> 01:10:21.000
Scott Payne: What your resources are and I think it gets back to a conversation about like what, like what's your budget in terms of in terms of doing this is there, you know, like we like if we're going to send a survey. We will use Survey Monkey, which enables us to

638
01:10:22.110 --> 01:10:41.100
Scott Payne: Do some customization and sort of build. Exactly. You know what we're looking to build into the survey. Although, like, I mean, there are any number of different like free options as well. I would say that like I would say that survey design and and you know and thoughtfulness, in terms of

639
01:10:42.180 --> 01:10:49.230
Scott Payne: The like the logic behind the questions that you're and you're asking and how you're asking them and how you're presenting them.

640
01:10:49.980 --> 01:11:00.420
Scott Payne: And thoughtfulness around the audience that you're engaging is probably ultimately more important than the degree of sophistication of tool that you're using.

641
01:11:00.840 --> 01:11:13.410
Scott Payne: And like, unless you specifically have like things that you're looking to try and achieve around doing a survey where you need tools that you know only some of those paid options are going to give you access to

642
01:11:14.550 --> 01:11:22.920
Wade: It was less about features is more about if there was a assumption about using this talk to on a website versus external, I don't know, like some sort of

643
01:11:24.240 --> 01:11:24.900
Wade: That or something.

644
01:11:25.320 --> 01:11:34.290
Scott Payne: I don't think so. I think if you ask the right questions and you ask them, well and you ask them to the right people and you're the right you have the right organization or the right person to be asking those questions that people, you know,

645
01:11:35.250 --> 01:11:39.990
Scott Payne: Aren't going to hold it against you, that you're using a stock tool as opposed to a customized. Oh, yeah.

646
01:11:42.690 --> 01:11:54.960
Mel Sutjiadi: But that is actually a good topic because we're talking about pole and as a group, we want it. We've been thinking about like doing a poll to internally. I don't know. Kelly, Jeff. The questions and topics in mind.

647
01:11:55.800 --> 01:11:57.360
Kelly Morris: I do. I'm happy to

648
01:11:58.890 --> 01:12:04.830
Kelly Morris: Kind of see them out loud, maybe what I'll do will try poll. How's that, and I'll send it to you.

649
01:12:06.720 --> 01:12:08.580
Kelly Morris: If you all signed up for this.

650
01:12:10.260 --> 01:12:16.050
Kelly Morris: You know, through the system and I have all your emails. I've seen meetup does some weird stuff so

651
01:12:17.310 --> 01:12:27.090
Kelly Morris: But one of the ideas we had, I can show you now Google ads and how that can work for you. She and I you might be interested in that one. And a lot of us are for, you know, private companies. So it might not be

652
01:12:28.650 --> 01:12:31.350
Kelly Morris: The best, but for any nonprofit. It works well.

653
01:12:33.270 --> 01:12:37.620
Mel Sutjiadi: Just a bit let's back up a little bit. So basically trying to figure out is

654
01:12:38.730 --> 01:12:55.770
Mel Sutjiadi: We're trying, we are still in the process of rebuilding this Meetup group so sure to hear topics that you'd like to learn more in the next few months, and maybe in the next year as well. So yeah, he can

655
01:12:55.800 --> 01:12:56.610
Mel Sutjiadi: Fill all good.

656
01:12:57.030 --> 01:12:57.570
Kelly Morris: Well, we

657
01:12:57.690 --> 01:13:00.180
Kelly Morris: We talked a little bit about cybersecurity.

658
01:13:01.920 --> 01:13:07.170
Kelly Morris: CRM evaluation. We talked a bit about that last month, but seems to be one that people are thrilled about

659
01:13:08.160 --> 01:13:19.230
Kelly Morris: I like this. This is Scott's title was SEO to supercharge your website. So if people are interested in learning more about SEO and how that can, you know, affect your

660
01:13:20.070 --> 01:13:32.310
Kelly Morris: Your Google standings. That'd be a good one. I know. I'd be interested always kind of geek out on SEO and video tools, people are making videos and

661
01:13:33.600 --> 01:13:39.090
Kelly Morris: What is this one and add more rocket fuel to your digital reports.

662
01:13:40.470 --> 01:13:55.230
Kelly Morris: And not sure if anybody's looking to build reports on this group, but let me know if you are, and also advertising so of the digital age. Is anybody doing some advertising. At this point, Destiny looking at it.

663
01:13:56.340 --> 01:13:57.210
Kelly Morris: Anyone else

664
01:13:58.230 --> 01:14:04.770
Kelly Morris: Sheena, any, any interest at wellspring and doing more sort of digital placement of ads, just to

665
01:14:06.480 --> 01:14:09.720
Kelly Morris: You know, share the share the information with the world.

666
01:14:11.640 --> 01:14:20.340
Sheena’s iPhone: Yes, we are currently hiring a communications director that we're hoping will be able to start to get us thinking about that.

667
01:14:20.850 --> 01:14:21.330
Excellent.

668
01:14:23.820 --> 01:14:32.460
Kelly Morris: Great. So if anybody has any other ideas titles chats that you'd like to have. I'm happy to start to

669
01:14:33.690 --> 01:14:35.250
Kelly Morris: Seek, you know,

670
01:14:36.390 --> 01:14:51.480
Kelly Morris: Speakers and any other volunteers who would like to share their knowledge with this group, and we're hoping that we can grow it. So please do share and our next event is in June.

671
01:14:53.430 --> 01:14:55.410
Kelly Morris: June 17 as the next day.

672
01:14:56.940 --> 01:15:00.150
Kelly Morris: Figure we have won't really be going anywhere. Too far. Let me know if you

673
01:15:01.380 --> 01:15:02.010
Kelly Morris: And

674
01:15:05.190 --> 01:15:05.670
Kelly Morris: Sorry.

675
01:15:05.850 --> 01:15:06.870
DDeere: I've got a cruise book.

676
01:15:07.170 --> 01:15:07.680
Oh, there you go.

677
01:15:09.210 --> 01:15:09.540
DDeere: Now,

678
01:15:10.710 --> 01:15:11.700
Kelly Morris: Yeah, awesome.

679
01:15:11.940 --> 01:15:13.260
Forest Park: fly straight to New York.

680
01:15:13.560 --> 01:15:13.920
Kelly Morris: Yeah.

681
01:15:14.640 --> 01:15:22.590
DDeere: Excellent. The other thing, too. I did and I was hoping maybe get a little bit more from from everybody in this today and I recognize, of course, we have time constraints, but

682
01:15:22.920 --> 01:15:32.820
DDeere: Some of the challenges you know even if it over the next, you know, month before the next meeting. If something comes up and you go, geez, you know, that is a challenge that I faced to do with the IT side of things.

683
01:15:33.240 --> 01:15:41.040
DDeere: Write it down and make a note, keep track of those sorts of things. Because that's gold for people that Chris and I to be able to help you if we understand what the challenges.

684
01:15:42.270 --> 01:15:42.870
Kelly Morris: Excellent.

685
01:15:44.280 --> 01:15:51.270
Kelly Morris: Well, in the interest of time, I will let you all go for this nice fine Wednesday evening and yeah

686
01:15:51.540 --> 01:15:52.950
Kelly Morris: Thank you so much for joining.

687
01:15:53.010 --> 01:16:09.480
Mel Sutjiadi: So one more thing on the pole and survey that we're planning to send out. We're going to send it into the group. So I noticed that I think Chris and do a thing. You guys are not in the miracle.

688
01:16:11.700 --> 01:16:12.270
DDeere: Ah,

689
01:16:12.390 --> 01:16:21.090
Mel Sutjiadi: That is, make sure you guys are in the Meetup group. So that will be able to send you a survey and you'll be able to receive or send us your email address.

690
01:16:21.570 --> 01:16:21.930
Kelly Morris: Good.

691
01:16:22.590 --> 01:16:23.340
Thanks David's

692
01:16:28.230 --> 01:16:29.580
Wade: What survey tool user

693
01:16:31.350 --> 01:16:31.800
Kelly Morris: Sorry.

694
01:16:32.250 --> 01:16:34.230
Wade: What survey tools are you using

695
01:16:36.180 --> 01:16:37.110
Kelly Morris: I know which one do you want

696
01:16:40.230 --> 01:16:40.830
Wade: Doesn't matter.

697
01:16:41.520 --> 01:16:42.600
Mel Sutjiadi: Google Form, but

698
01:16:43.380 --> 01:16:45.570
DDeere: The nice for you on built in to

699
01:16:46.980 --> 01:16:53.250
DDeere: Microsoft Office 365 if you have that in any of your organization's if you don't, you guys are spending money. You don't need to

700
01:16:54.240 --> 01:16:55.650
Mel Sutjiadi: Oh well, Google Form. It's free.

701
01:16:56.070 --> 01:16:58.650
DDeere: Yeah, perfect. Google also similar

702
01:16:58.920 --> 01:17:00.540
Wade: Sounds good to say, oh,

703
01:17:00.690 --> 01:17:00.990
Sorry.

704
01:17:02.250 --> 01:17:07.230
Wade: I was gonna say the security professionals information exchange. They use mentor com

705
01:17:08.580 --> 01:17:10.110
Wade: Of course there's other ones out there, but

706
01:17:10.470 --> 01:17:10.980
Mel Sutjiadi: Men to

707
01:17:12.840 --> 01:17:16.830
Wade: Me and and ti com just loaded

708
01:17:17.790 --> 01:17:18.600
Kelly Morris: While on

709
01:17:19.170 --> 01:17:21.510
Kelly Morris: On these screens, right. I've used that

710
01:17:21.900 --> 01:17:22.830
Kelly Morris: Core mentee.

711
01:17:24.720 --> 01:17:28.320
Wade: And there's also live poll.com to something that I was trying to use

712
01:17:29.850 --> 01:17:31.980
Mel Sutjiadi: The same a slideshow basically kind of

713
01:17:32.820 --> 01:17:36.630
Wade: Similar but slide. Oh, has much more content engagement. Right.

714
01:17:36.930 --> 01:17:37.470
Wade: Something like

715
01:17:37.590 --> 01:17:38.370
Wade: A little assist

716
01:17:40.620 --> 01:17:42.780
Wade: Much yeah binary questions.

717
01:17:43.950 --> 01:17:49.290
Kelly Morris: There's a whole system, even with zoom it just we had locked it down for some reason. So

718
01:17:50.220 --> 01:17:50.580
Mel Sutjiadi: We'll have

719
01:17:52.320 --> 01:17:54.540
Kelly Morris: Not sure why, but anyway.

720
01:17:55.980 --> 01:17:56.370
Kelly Morris: Great.

721
01:17:56.580 --> 01:17:57.600
Scott Payne: Oh, alright.

722
01:17:58.230 --> 01:17:59.820
Kelly Morris: Awesome. Well, thanks so much.

723
01:18:00.060 --> 01:18:13.050
Kelly Morris: Feel free to reach out. I'm happy to send notes to everybody think we've got almost everybody's email addresses. So if you have any questions, she know good luck with everything tell patty. I said hello

724
01:18:13.950 --> 01:18:15.390
Sheena’s iPhone: Well, thanks you guys for having me.

725
01:18:15.690 --> 01:18:17.100
Mel Sutjiadi: Pleasure hopefully go come out.

726
01:18:17.100 --> 01:18:17.640
Kelly Morris: Of it there.

727
01:18:20.760 --> 01:18:21.300
DDeere: Thank you.

728
01:18:22.650 --> 01:18:23.370
Mel Sutjiadi: Everyone